NOMATEI – A Koinônia of Minumental Figures


Nomatei* is a monument to the unacknowledged people. Nomatei identifies differences of characters, advocates diversity, and eliminates hierarchies and social positions. Nomatei is a ‘minument’ to human nature and to the thesis that every one holds an important role in society. It offers space to frailty, to the seemingly insignificant and the often bewildered.

How does one capture external characteristics which embody what is hidden within? It might be said that figuration in contemporary art is currently a rare phenomenon; yet, at the same time the figure may be accessible and identifiable to most people. More so, the role of the figurative monument is unclear in contemporary art and life. Nomatei seeks to address this lack, explores complementarity, understanding and social behaviour, through the heterogeneity of the figure and through minumentalisation.

The constant repositioning of these sculptural ‘sketches’ seeks to explore experiences of cooperation, loneliness, tolerance, success, loss, prejudice, and ultimately coexistence. The mode of working, sketching in three dimensions, emphasizes body language and poise, over detail, arguing that the whole body is as eloquent as a portrait of each one of us. Recognition of the sitter happens from the total body not just the face. The scale and presentation balance collectivity and solitude. We exist as ourselves but also through others. For this reason we might consider them not to be separate pieces but one collective piece of work, a form of human society.

Nomatei is a monument for the inhabitants of the University of Lincoln as a community. People who perhaps have nothing in common apart from a common denominator, the love for learning, the inclination to research, to the new, to a collective future

*Nomatei: a group of eponymous people that share the same ideology in this case the idea of a university.

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